Doing Better for Children

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About

The well-being of children is high on the policy agenda across the OECD. But what is the actual state of child well-being today? How much are governments spending on children and are they spending it at the right times? What social and family policies have the most impact during children’s earliest years? Is growing up in a single-parent household detrimental to children? Is inequality that persists across generations a threat to child well-being? Doing Better for Children addresses these questions and more.

Available Chapters

Table of contents – click here.

Chapter 2

How does child well-being compare across OECD countries? Chapter 2 presents a child well-being framework and compares outcome indicators for children in OECD countries across six dimensions: material well-being; housing and environment; education; health; risk behaviours; and quality of school life. Read the full chapter Comparative Child Well-being across the OECD.

Chapter 7

Chapter 7 offers a range of policy recommendations for improving child well-being. Read the full concluding chapter Doing Better for Children: The Way Forward.

Statisitics

The OECDs child well-being framework compares outcome indicators for children in OECD countries across six dimensions: material well-being; housing and environment; education; health; risk behaviours; and quality of school life.

Data are available at:

  • OECD eXplorer combines maps and graphs with stories allowing users to examine time developments and interrelations between indicators. Select indicator for colours in map, for scatterplot, see stories with animated graphs; generate your own stories.
  • Statlinks (at bottom of each chart/table) from chapter 2 Comparative Child Well-being across the OECD.

See also

Doing Better for Families

The OECD Family database

Child well-being database

Country-specific highlights

External links

Doing Better for Children media review

Doing Better for Children website

Doing Better for Children press release

Spend early on children, says OECD