Brain Hero

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Brain Hero is a three-minute game-inspired video that depicts how actions by a range of people in the family and community can affect a child’s development. Based loosely on such games as “Guitar Hero”, “SimCity” and “The Game of Life,” the video adapts the visual sensibility of interactive game models to a video format and portrays how actions taken by parents, teachers, policymakers, and others can influence life outcomes for both the child and the surrounding community. [1] Brain Hero is focused on the creation and dissemination of innovative storytelling products designed to inform the public discourse around policies and practices that support healthy brain development during childhood. [2]

Background

Brain Hero is the product of a two-year collaboration between Harvard’s Center on the Developing Child, the Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute and the Interactive Media Division of the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California to develop and test new ways of communicating the science of early childhood development. Brain Hero is the collaboration’s first product. [3]

Publicity

Brain Hero is a recent product. It came out in early June 2011. However, it was noticed by UK Labour MP Graham Allen who is leading an early childhood intervention programme and it was reblogged and advertised by different organisations. [4]

It was featured in blogs like This Is Parents as Teachers [5], and organisations like Smart Start [6]and the National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention. [7]

Related reports and work papers

  • Early Childhood Program Evaluations: A Decision-Maker’s Guide, National Forum on Early Childhood Policy and Programs, December 2011. Full guide available here
  • A Science-Based Framework for Early Childhood Policy, National Forum on Early Childhood Policy and Programs and the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, August 2007. Full report available here
  • The Science of Early Childhood Development: Closing the Gap Between What We Know and What We Do, The National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, January 2007. Full report available here

Related videos

The science of early childhood development

[8]

The impact of early adversity on children’s development

[9]

See also

Child well-being

Early Childhood

Child well-being and progress

Early Childhood Education and Care

Early Childhood Care and Development

References

  1. Center on the Developing Child – Harvard University, May 2011. Details available here
  2. Mgotsis, ‘Brain Hero’ making global rounds, University of Southern California Creative Media and Behavioral Health Center, June 9, 2011. Full article available here
  3. Center on the Developing Child – Harvard University, May 2011. Details available here
  4. Mgotsis, ‘Brain Hero’ making global rounds, University of Southern California Creative Media and Behavioral Health Center, June 9, 2011. Full article available here
  5. Simpson P. (2011), Be a Brain Hero, This Is Parents as Teachers, June 15, 2011. Full post available here
  6. Smart Start, “Brain Hero” Video Worth Watching, June 6, 2011. Full post here
  7. the National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Brain Hero communications video, June 2011. Full post here
  8. The science of early childhood development, InBrief Series, Center on the Developing Child, Harvard University, 2011. Video available here
  9. The impact of early adversity on children’s development, InBrief Series, Center on the Developing Child, Harvard University, 2011. Video available here

External links

Center on the Developing Child – Harvard University

University of Southern California Creative Media and Behavioral Health Center

The Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute

This Is parents as Teachers

Smart Start official website

The National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention