Online Discussions

Youth Wellbeing – Measurement and Policy

From:01-12-2014

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To: 16-12-2014

Welcome!

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Youth well-being: measuring what matters!

From 09:00 (GMT) 1 until 16 December 2014 !

We invite you to join the conversations on how the goal of youth well-being can be better incorporated into measurement and policy.

Context

The aim of this discussion is to map out the main issues for youth well-being and to identify organisations and initiatives working in this field. This discussion will provide the foundation for a more in-depth online debate that we will be hosting in early 2015.

Everyone is welcome to join the discussion, and we are especially interested to hear from students and young people from around the world.

There are more youth living in the world today than at any other time in human history. There are now an unprecedented 1.8 billion adolescents and young adults aged between 10 and 24, making up over a quarter of the world population (UN Population Fund). However, young people’s voices are not always heard in measurement and policy debates.

Leading questions

  • What are the most important factors for the well-being of young people? (see related materials)
  • What is the status of youth well-being today?
  • What policies have had the most impact on youth well-being in the past? Provide examples of successful initiatives.
  • How can we ensure that young people’s needs are reflected in the Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals agenda?

Related Material

The OECD is one of four partners in a European Commission-funded project called Web Communities for Statistics and Social Innovation (Web-COSI), whose overarching aim is to ensure ‘Statistics for Everyone’. Over two years, Web-COSI will be exploring innovative ways to increase public engagement with the production, promotion, and use of ‘beyond GDP’ statistics and data.

Contribute!

Here is the link to this online discussion page: http://wikiprogress.org/online_discussions/youth-wellbeing/youth-wellbeing-measurement-and-policy/ and the hashtags for Twitter are #Youthand #Wellbeing or you can follow @Wikiprogress.

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Making data more accessible for society at large

From:11-06-2014

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To: 24-03-2014

Welcome!

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Making data more accessible for society at large: the role of open data, communication and technology

From 11 June 09:00 (GMT) until 24 June 2014 !

Wikiprogress and partners invite you to join this discussion on the role of open data, communication and technology in making data more accessible for society at large.

Context

The purpose of this online discussion is to take a broad look at the opportunities and challenges of using open data, visualisation, and other technology-based approaches to making data more accessible for society. We would like to hear from people who are dealing with these issues in their work and research, and also from people who are new to the topic but would like to participate in the debate to learn more.

Information is knowledge, and knowledge is power. In order to empower citizens and ensure they have the information they need, we need to find innovative ways to make data more accessible for society at large. “Accessibility” can mean different things in this context.

Open Data

First, it can mean making data more freely available for people to download, use, and share with others. This is the principle behind the Open Data movement, which encourages governments and other organisations to make all kinds of data that are relevant to people’s lives completely transparent and available to all. Engaged citizens can use open data to make better-informed decisions, to hold governments and other institutions accountable for their actions, and to contribute to finding solutions to social problems. For many, open data is also the key to the “data revolution” needed to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

Communication

Not everyone has the time or the ability to make the most out of raw data though. A second way of making data more accessible is through effective communication. Data producers, or “intermediaries” such as bloggers, data journalists, campaigners, and other communicators, can make the underlying meaning of data more easily understandable through the use of effective storytelling. Effective data visualisation, in particular, can be an immensely powerful way of conveying the sense of complex analysis in clear and simple terms for a broad, non-expert audience.

Interactive Technology

Finally, accessibility can also refer to ease of participation. Interactive technologies such as mobile apps and crowdsourcing platforms, can enable all members of society to contribute as data producers, not just data consumers. Citizen-generated data is a relatively new field, but one with a large potential to collect information that is directly relevant to people’s well-being, in a low-cost and timely manner. Innovative projects such as Mappiness, OpenStreetMap, HarrasMap, and Moodometer demonstrate the wide range of uses of crowdsourced data.

Leading questions

  • What role can Open Data play to increase citizen’s engagement with well-being and progress statistics?
  • How can data visualisation and storytelling be used to increase our understanding of data?
  • What are the best examples of crowd-sourced data related to well-being and progress?
  • How else can technology or other innovative methods be used to make data more accessible to society at large?

Related Blogs:

Background

The OECD is one of four partners in a European Commission-funded project called Web Communities for Statistics and Social Innovation (Web-COSI), whose overarching aim is to ensure ‘Statistics for Everyone’. Over two years, Web-COSI will be exploring innovative ways to increase public engagement with the production, promotion, and use of ‘beyond GDP’ statistics and data. Wikiprogress will be conducting a number of activities in 2014 to this end.

Contribute!

Here is the link to the page http://wikiprogress.org/online_discussions/wellbeing/making-data-more-accessible-for-society-at-large/ and the hashtags for Twitter are #CitizenEngagement and#StatsForAll or you can follow @Wikiprogress.

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Engaging citizens in well-being and progress statistics

From:22-04-2014

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To: 30-04-2014

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Engaging citizens in well-being and progress statistics: good practice from Europe and around the world

From 22 April 09:00 (GMT) until 2 May 2014 !

Wikiprogress and partners invite you to participate in this discussion on the role of citizens engagement in the development and use of well-being and progress statistics.

Context

During 2014, Wikiprogress will be focusing on the question of how to increase citizen engagement in well-being and progress statistics. This is a key issue for the movement of initiatives around the world striving to develop better statistics of well-being and progress. While this movement is incredibly diverse – encompassing different actors, frameworks, geographic scales, and objectives – it is driven by a common belief that measurement can bring about change in policy, behaviour and attitudes that will have a real (positive) impact on people’s lives, now and into the future. For this to happen, we need to be sure that a) we are measuring what really matters to people, and that b) those measures will be used in policy and public debate. Citizen engagement is central to achieving both these objectives.

There are many different ways that citizen engagement can play a role in the development and use of progress statistics, through:

  • Public consultations, with government and civil society organisations, at the local or national level, on the best frameworks to use for the measurement of well-being.
  • Crowdsourcing data collection, via web platforms or mobile technology, such as the method used in the subjective well-being app Mappiness.
  • User feedback on existing measurement frameworks or methods, such as the interactive technology used by the OECD Better Life Index.
  • Use and re-use of open data sources, where members of the public can access official and non-official data to create stories, visualisations and apps to produce innovative solutions to collective problems, such as those available on publicdata.eu

Leading questions

  • How can citizen engagement improve the development and use of well-being and progress statistics?
  • Do you have any examples of good practice in citizen engagement in well-being and progress statistics?
  • What role can technology – such as mobile apps or interactive web platforms – play in improving citizen engagement with well-being and progress statistics?

 

Background

The OECD is one of four partners in a European Commission-funded project called Web Communities for Statistics and Social Innovation (Web-COSI), whose overarching aim is to ensure ‘Statistics for Everyone’. Over two years, Web-COSI will be exploring innovative ways to increase public engagement with the production, promotion, and use of ‘beyond GDP’ statistics and data. Wikiprogress will be conducting a number of activities in 2014 to this end.

Blog: Why engage citizens in wellbeing data?

Contribute!

Here is the link to the page http://wikiprogress.org/online_discussions/web-cosi/engaging-citizens-in-well-being-and-progress-statistics/ and the hashtags for Twitter are #CitizenEngagement and#StatsForAll.

NOTE: Disqus (discussion tool below) works on Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome, Safari, and Opera. It will NOT work on versions of Internet Explorer other than 9!

To participate, simply type your comment below (as a guest) or register directly via Disqus, Twitter or Facebook before typing your comment. To insert a URL hyperlink, make sure you shorten the URL first before posting it, otherwise it may not work. (e.g. using bitly, google url shorterner, tiny url…)

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