Online Discussions

Youth Wellbeing – Measurement and Policy

From:01-12-2014

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To: 16-12-2014

Welcome!

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Youth well-being: measuring what matters!

From 09:00 (GMT) 1 until 16 December 2014 !

We invite you to join the conversations on how the goal of youth well-being can be better incorporated into measurement and policy.

Context

The aim of this discussion is to map out the main issues for youth well-being and to identify organisations and initiatives working in this field. This discussion will provide the foundation for a more in-depth online debate that we will be hosting in early 2015.

Everyone is welcome to join the discussion, and we are especially interested to hear from students and young people from around the world.

There are more youth living in the world today than at any other time in human history. There are now an unprecedented 1.8 billion adolescents and young adults aged between 10 and 24, making up over a quarter of the world population (UN Population Fund). However, young people’s voices are not always heard in measurement and policy debates.

Leading questions

  • What are the most important factors for the well-being of young people? (see related materials)
  • What is the status of youth well-being today?
  • What policies have had the most impact on youth well-being in the past? Provide examples of successful initiatives.
  • How can we ensure that young people’s needs are reflected in the Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals agenda?

Related Material

The OECD is one of four partners in a European Commission-funded project called Web Communities for Statistics and Social Innovation (Web-COSI), whose overarching aim is to ensure ‘Statistics for Everyone’. Over two years, Web-COSI will be exploring innovative ways to increase public engagement with the production, promotion, and use of ‘beyond GDP’ statistics and data.

Contribute!

Here is the link to this online discussion page: http://wikiprogress.org/online_discussions/youth-wellbeing/youth-wellbeing-measurement-and-policy/ and the hashtags for Twitter are #Youthand #Wellbeing or you can follow @Wikiprogress.

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Join Us


 

Making data more accessible for society at large

From:11-06-2014

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To: 24-03-2014

Welcome!

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Making data more accessible for society at large: the role of open data, communication and technology

From 11 June 09:00 (GMT) until 24 June 2014 !

Wikiprogress and partners invite you to join this discussion on the role of open data, communication and technology in making data more accessible for society at large.

Context

The purpose of this online discussion is to take a broad look at the opportunities and challenges of using open data, visualisation, and other technology-based approaches to making data more accessible for society. We would like to hear from people who are dealing with these issues in their work and research, and also from people who are new to the topic but would like to participate in the debate to learn more.

Information is knowledge, and knowledge is power. In order to empower citizens and ensure they have the information they need, we need to find innovative ways to make data more accessible for society at large. “Accessibility” can mean different things in this context.

Open Data

First, it can mean making data more freely available for people to download, use, and share with others. This is the principle behind the Open Data movement, which encourages governments and other organisations to make all kinds of data that are relevant to people’s lives completely transparent and available to all. Engaged citizens can use open data to make better-informed decisions, to hold governments and other institutions accountable for their actions, and to contribute to finding solutions to social problems. For many, open data is also the key to the “data revolution” needed to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

Communication

Not everyone has the time or the ability to make the most out of raw data though. A second way of making data more accessible is through effective communication. Data producers, or “intermediaries” such as bloggers, data journalists, campaigners, and other communicators, can make the underlying meaning of data more easily understandable through the use of effective storytelling. Effective data visualisation, in particular, can be an immensely powerful way of conveying the sense of complex analysis in clear and simple terms for a broad, non-expert audience.

Interactive Technology

Finally, accessibility can also refer to ease of participation. Interactive technologies such as mobile apps and crowdsourcing platforms, can enable all members of society to contribute as data producers, not just data consumers. Citizen-generated data is a relatively new field, but one with a large potential to collect information that is directly relevant to people’s well-being, in a low-cost and timely manner. Innovative projects such as Mappiness, OpenStreetMap, HarrasMap, and Moodometer demonstrate the wide range of uses of crowdsourced data.

Leading questions

  • What role can Open Data play to increase citizen’s engagement with well-being and progress statistics?
  • How can data visualisation and storytelling be used to increase our understanding of data?
  • What are the best examples of crowd-sourced data related to well-being and progress?
  • How else can technology or other innovative methods be used to make data more accessible to society at large?

Related Blogs:

Background

The OECD is one of four partners in a European Commission-funded project called Web Communities for Statistics and Social Innovation (Web-COSI), whose overarching aim is to ensure ‘Statistics for Everyone’. Over two years, Web-COSI will be exploring innovative ways to increase public engagement with the production, promotion, and use of ‘beyond GDP’ statistics and data. Wikiprogress will be conducting a number of activities in 2014 to this end.

Contribute!

Here is the link to the page http://wikiprogress.org/online_discussions/wellbeing/making-data-more-accessible-for-society-at-large/ and the hashtags for Twitter are #CitizenEngagement and#StatsForAll or you can follow @Wikiprogress.

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Engaging citizens in well-being and progress statistics

From:22-04-2014

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To: 30-04-2014

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Engaging citizens in well-being and progress statistics: good practice from Europe and around the world

From 22 April 09:00 (GMT) until 2 May 2014 !

Wikiprogress and partners invite you to participate in this discussion on the role of citizens engagement in the development and use of well-being and progress statistics.

Context

During 2014, Wikiprogress will be focusing on the question of how to increase citizen engagement in well-being and progress statistics. This is a key issue for the movement of initiatives around the world striving to develop better statistics of well-being and progress. While this movement is incredibly diverse – encompassing different actors, frameworks, geographic scales, and objectives – it is driven by a common belief that measurement can bring about change in policy, behaviour and attitudes that will have a real (positive) impact on people’s lives, now and into the future. For this to happen, we need to be sure that a) we are measuring what really matters to people, and that b) those measures will be used in policy and public debate. Citizen engagement is central to achieving both these objectives.

There are many different ways that citizen engagement can play a role in the development and use of progress statistics, through:

  • Public consultations, with government and civil society organisations, at the local or national level, on the best frameworks to use for the measurement of well-being.
  • Crowdsourcing data collection, via web platforms or mobile technology, such as the method used in the subjective well-being app Mappiness.
  • User feedback on existing measurement frameworks or methods, such as the interactive technology used by the OECD Better Life Index.
  • Use and re-use of open data sources, where members of the public can access official and non-official data to create stories, visualisations and apps to produce innovative solutions to collective problems, such as those available on publicdata.eu

Leading questions

  • How can citizen engagement improve the development and use of well-being and progress statistics?
  • Do you have any examples of good practice in citizen engagement in well-being and progress statistics?
  • What role can technology – such as mobile apps or interactive web platforms – play in improving citizen engagement with well-being and progress statistics?

 

Background

The OECD is one of four partners in a European Commission-funded project called Web Communities for Statistics and Social Innovation (Web-COSI), whose overarching aim is to ensure ‘Statistics for Everyone’. Over two years, Web-COSI will be exploring innovative ways to increase public engagement with the production, promotion, and use of ‘beyond GDP’ statistics and data. Wikiprogress will be conducting a number of activities in 2014 to this end.

Blog: Why engage citizens in wellbeing data?

Contribute!

Here is the link to the page http://wikiprogress.org/online_discussions/web-cosi/engaging-citizens-in-well-being-and-progress-statistics/ and the hashtags for Twitter are #CitizenEngagement and#StatsForAll.

NOTE: Disqus (discussion tool below) works on Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Chrome, Safari, and Opera. It will NOT work on versions of Internet Explorer other than 9!

To participate, simply type your comment below (as a guest) or register directly via Disqus, Twitter or Facebook before typing your comment. To insert a URL hyperlink, make sure you shorten the URL first before posting it, otherwise it may not work. (e.g. using bitly, google url shorterner, tiny url…)

How should older people’s well-being be measured?

From:03-10-2013

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To: 17-10-2013

Online Discussion from 3 until 17 October 2013!

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How Should Older People’s Well-being be Measured?

Allianz – Open Knowledge, HelpAge, Centre for Social Protection, European Network on Measuring Progress, Global Alliance of International Longevity Centres, Institute of Social and Medical Studies, International Council on Social Welfare, OECD – Employment, Labour and Social Affairs, PRO Global, Wikiprogress and World Bankinvite you to participate in this online discussion from 3 – 17 October 2013

Background

The Global AgeWatch Index was launched by the HelpAge Network on 1 October – the UN International Day of Older Persons.It is the first global index to rank countries according to the social and economic well-being of older people.
The index provides a measure of 13 different indicators across four key domains of income security, health status, education and employment, as well as aspects of the enabling environment already identified by older people as being of utmost importance to them.

  • The Index is groundbreaking in that it broadens the way we understand the needs and opportunities of older people, going far beyond the adequacy of pensions and other income support which, though critical, often narrows policy thinking and debate regarding the needs of this age group.
  • It involves a pioneering application of human development methodology to the construction of an index of the well-being of older people.
  • It challenges countries in every part of the world. The report’s ranking of countries in terms of the needs and opportunities of older people shows that a country’s GNP neither guarantees good living for older people nor is an obstacle to improving their situation. Older people in poorer countries often have better lives on average in several key respects than those in somewhat richer ones. The index of older people, thus, serves as a challenge to governments and community groups to raise their sights as to what is possible. As the number and proportion of older people rises in many countries, the importance of these lessons cannot be overstated.

It has been developed and constructed from international data sets drawn from the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, the World Bank, World Health Organization, International Labour Organisation and the Gallup World Poll.

It has benefited from a global advisory panel of more than 40 independent experts in ageing, health, social protection and human development. The Index will be developed over time to expand from its current number of 91 countries to all UN Member States.

In the spirit of the global call for the “data revolution” to “leave no one behind” in the post-2015 development framework, it is hoped that the Index will become a central reference point for governments, employers, civil society, communities, families and older people themselves in order to ensure a culture that does not discriminate on the basis of age. A culture in which contributions of older people to their economies and societies are recognised and supported is one which “leaves no one behind”.

Leading questions

  • How can evidence gathering tools such as the Global AgeWatch Index be useful in fostering progress towards ensuring economic and social rights of older people around the world?
  • What are the most important domains of wellbeing of older persons? What specific indicators can you suggest for each of the four domains of wellbeing used in constructing the Global AgeWatch Index?
  • The Global AgeWatch framework offers a composite index, domain-specific indices in four domains of wellbeing of older persons, as well as a full set of individual indicators. What approach is the most effective in your view in engaging policymakers?
  • What public policies and programmes had the most impact on the welfare of older persons? Provide specific examples.
  • What is the best way to ensure collecting data on ageing happens in a systematic way and that this data is reflected in the national and international data sets used in the goals, targets and indicators for the post-2015 framework? What difference would this make both to development and to older people?

Resources

Contribute!

Anyone with an Internet connection is invited to participate in the discussion and we encourage you to express your views on this pressing issue. Please note however that comments will be moderated to ensure that there is no spam disrupting the discussion.

Here is the link and the hash tags for Twitter are #OlderPeople and #AgeingIndex.

To participate, simply type your comment below or register directly via Disqus, Twitter or Facebook before typing your comment. To insert a URL hyperlink, make sure you shorten the URL first before posting it, otherwise it may not work. (e.g. using bitly, google url shorterner, tiny url…)

How should child well-being be measured in view of future development frameworks?

From:19-06-2013

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To: 02-07-2013

Wikiprogress Online Discussion: June 2013
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SYNTHESIS REPORT of the online consultation! How should child well-being be measured in view of future development frameworks?
Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children, World Health Organization, Wikiprogress, Wikigender and Wikichild invite you to participate in this online discussion
NOW CLOSED – contact: info@wikiprogress.org

Measuring child well-being has traditionally rested on economic measures such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP); however, it is now widely accepted that the well-being of the nation is influenced by a broad range of factors including economic performance, quality of life, the state of the environment, sustainability, equality, as well as individual well-being.

Over the last decade, organisations around the world have been developing new indicators of progress that look beyond GDP and economic growth when measuring child well-being.

The well-being of children is high on the agenda for policy makers and this online consultation, hosted by Wikichild, seeks to engage discussion on the most effective means of measuring child well-being and how these measures should be applied to upcoming development frameworks such as the Post 2015 agenda.

Leading Questions

  • What is the actual state of child well-being today?
  • What are the most important domains of well-being – specifically for children?
  • What policies have had the most impact on children in the past? Provide examples of successful initiatives
  • Should there be a child development goal in the Post 2015 framework?

Contribute!

We look forward to your participation! We strongly encourage you to disseminate news about the online discussion via your networks and on Twitter using #childwellbeing and the following link to this page: http://wikiprogress.org/online_discussions/child-wellbeing/how-should-child-well-being-be-measured-in-view-of-future-development-frameworks/ Anyone with an Internet connection is invited to participate in the discussion and we encourage you to express your views on this pressing issue.
Please note however that comments will be moderated to ensure that there is no spam disrupting the discussion.To participate, simply type your comment below or register directly via Disqus, Twitter or Facebook before typing your comment. To insert a URL hyperlink, make sure you shorten the URL first before posting it, otherwise it may not work. (e.g. using bitly, google url shorterner, tiny url…)

Wikichild Resources

Reducing poverty is achievable

From:06-03-2013

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To: 15-03-2013

The Wikiprogress 6-15 March online consultation!

SYNTHESIS REPORT of the online consultation!

Reducing poverty is achievable
Finding those who are hidden by inequalities

The OECD Global Forum on Development (GFD) will be convened on 4-5 April 2013, with discussions by renowned experts and leading policy-makers focusing on the global development agenda beyond 2015. The Wikiprogress community and partners are holding a public consultation* on this topic from 6-15 March. The outcomes will be presented at the Forum.

The topic of the online consultation

One of the key ways to address the inequalities which cause poverty is ensuring development is about people and how they live together. Ahead of the OECD GFD, Wikiprogress would like to highlight the individuals, families, communities and societies that have been hidden by social and economic inequalities. We would also like to bring to light the stories of successful programmes, policies and methodologies which have made a difference in people’s lives. The discussion opens on 6 March and closes on 15 March 2013 at 17h (GMT+1). The Global Forum on Development invites you to share your stories and/or solutions for:

  • People who are, have been or might be hidden from economic growth.
  • People who are, have been or might be hidden from social programmes.
  • People who are, have been or might be hidden from statistics and what this means for the well-being of societies.

To guide you in your interventions, please find some key questions below that the Forum and this consultation would like your views on.

Key Questions

The target of eliminating poverty as captured by the UN Millennium Declaration is achievable. Economic growth in developing and emerging economies has improved lives of many poor people and led to the emergence of a middle class. However, income inequalities have been rising in many countries and many people remain vulnerable. In addition, inequalities are increasingly being understood as stretching beyond income to a number of other characteristics such as gender, age, origin, labour-market status.

  • How can we ensure that all of these inequalities are addressed, since they have an impact both at individual and societal level?
  • What are the most effective ways to tackle the factors that drive these inequalities? How can we measure progress on reducing poverty in the years to come?

An important part of a new development framework is the well-being agenda, which was absent from the MDGs but has been widely discussed since the establishment, in 2008, of the Commission on the measurement of economic performance and social progress (also known as the Stiglitz-Sen-Fitoussi Commission).

  • How can the broader concept of progress inform post-2015 approaches to poverty reduction? How can well-being and progress indicators contribute to the broader process of defining and developing the post-2015 agenda?
  • What are country experiences for reducing poverty and increasing well-being using this approach? What is the role of development agencies to help advance this agenda?
* This discussion is brought to you by the OECD, Paris21, Save the Children, ODI’s Development Progress, the Oxford Poverty & Human Development Initiative (OPHI), UNICEF, Jeune Afrique, The Africa Report, European Report on Development (ERD), Wikigender, Wikichild and the Global Progress Research Network (GPRNet).

Contribute!

We look forward to your participation starting from Wednesday 6 March! We strongly encourage you to disseminate news about the online discussion via your networks and on Twitter using #OECDgfd and the following link to this page:http://bit.ly/13pzJi1

Anyone with an Internet connection is invited to participate in the discussion and we encourage you to express your views on this topic. Please note however that comments will be moderated to ensure that there is no spam disrupting the discussion.To participate, simply type your comment below or register directly via Disqus, Twitter or Facebook before typing your comment. To insert a URL hyperlink, make sure you shorten the URL first before posting it, otherwise it may not work. (e.g. using bitly, google url shorterner, tiny url…)

Thank you for contributing to this discussion. Please go here for more opportunities to participate in the Global Forum on Development

About the GFD

These questions will be discussed at the 2013 Global Forum on Development. High-level policy makers, academia, civil society and the private sector will look at these questions and explore challenges, opportunities and lessons learned about current poverty reduction policies and methods for fostering social cohesion and progress. They will exchange perspectives on how they can be addressed at international, national and local levels and the nexus between each. The results will contribute to the improvement of the poverty reduction policies designed and implemented by governments, international organisations and others in the post-2015 world. The Forum will be the first in a series of three forums to be held over the next three years focusing on how this could be done.

Thank you for contributing to this discussion. Please go here for more opportunities to participate in the Global Forum on Development

“We need to build our knowledge regarding what works or does not work to achieve better lives. We need new evidence and models to understand how people think and behave, and how policies can raise well-being given our new understanding.”
Martine Durand, OECD Chief Statistician
“Inequality is so important. There is a strong feeling among disadvantaged groups that their story is hidden in aggregate figures.”
Helen Clark – The former New Zealand prime minister and administrator of the UN Development Programme
“A focus on well-being means a shift in the way we look at development, one which takes into account disparities rather than averages. It means measuring what matters to people’s lives and finding the gaps in order to better focus on improving current quality of life while ensuring a sustainable future”.
Mario Pezzini, Director, OECD Development Centre

Key resources

Wikiprogress articles

Partners

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Canadian Index of Wellbeing Online Discussion

From:09-05-2012

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To: 23-05-2012

The Wikiprogress Team in Collaboration with the Canadian Index of Wellbeing!

As part of Civil Society, how the Canadian Index of Wellbeing (CIW) is leading change

The Global Progress Research Network, Wikiprogress and the Canadian Index of Wellbeing invite you to participate in an online discussion which will open on 9 May. The discussion will be open until 23 May and will provide inputs to the 4th OECD World Forum in New Delhi, India in October of 2012.

The title (and focus) of the World Forum will be “Measuring Well-Being for Development and Policy-Making”.

Background

Over the last decade, organisations around the world have been developing new indicators of progress that look beyond GDP and economic growth in measuring wellbeing. To date, the progress discourse has focused on the development of new measures and methodologies to gauge wellbeing at the local, national and international levels. Today, a new conversation is taking place: now that we have newer and smarter measures of progress, how can they be applied to policy? One of the leading organisations in the progress movement, the Canadian Index of Wellbeing (CIW), invites you to join this conversation and have your say in the next global phase of measuring what matters and in finding out how these indicators are going to be used at the policy level.

Ways to get involved

1. Watch the 9:15 minute long video presentation of the Index by Dr. Bryan Smale
2. Read the 3 leading questions listed below3. Write your feedback, comments, answers to the question, thoughts on the video or overall thoughts on applying indicators to policy to be a part of the conversation using the Disqus facility below. If you are including a link in your response, please be sure to use a URL shortener otherwise the link will not appear

 

Watch the Presentation

The Canadian Index of Wellbeing (CIW) goes beyond narrow economic measures like GDP and provides Canada’s only national index that measures wellbeing across a wide spectrum of domains. The work of CIW extends beyond Canada; both methods and models of the index have been used across the world by organisations developing more comprehensive measures of progress. As a leader in the “beyond GDP” movement, the CIW is promoting a dialogue of the future of measurement and the application of these indicators to policy.

Leading Questions

1. How can initiatives like the CIW foster the progress of societies in Canada and also around the world in the current economic climate?2. The CIW uses a combined approach to the development of alternative measures of wellbeing, including a composite index, dashboard, and full set of indicators. What approach is the most effective?3. Now that the first CIW Composite Index is in the public domain, the CIW has some examples of early uptake and use. How can initiatives like the CIW evaluate progress over time?
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